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University Gazette

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Calendar

Feb. 15

The Carolina Jazz Festival kicks off with a performance by the Ambrose Akinmusire Quartet in Memorial Hall at 7:30 p.m. This young trumpet innovator’s serene, elusive compositions reassemble conventional jazz elements in mercurial, unorthodox musings. To buy tickets for this event, visit the Carolina Performing Arts box office online or call 919-843-3333.

Feb. 16

Join the Center for the Study of the American South at the Love House at 5:30 p.m. for the opening reception of RISING, a collaborative multimedia research project, using photography and oral history to better understand coastal communities’ beliefs and understandings regarding climate change. The reception will feature remarks by project directors Baxter Miller and Ryan Stancil and snacks by Bill Smith of Crook’s Corner.

Feb. 16-17

Carolina Performing Arts will host the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at 8 p.m. at Memorial Hall. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra is dedicated to musical excellence, collaborating with the best conductors and guest artists in international music. To buy tickets for this event, visit the Carolina Performing Arts box office online  or call 919-843-3333.

The 10th season of the Process Series continues with The Future, a live interactive, technological theater event created and performed by Anonymous Ensemble. By giving the audience headphones, The Future capitalizes on various modes of translation, digitization and audio communication to ask the humans questions, record their responses and feed them back into the soundscape of the experience. Interactive performances are scheduled at 5 and 8 p.m. Feb. 16 and at 3 and 8 p.m. Feb. 17 at Swain Hall. Admission is free, but seating is limited and can be reserved with a $5 donation.

Feb. 19

Jacob and Esau, Isaac and Yishmael: The Future of Jewish-Christian and Jewish-Muslim Relations is the topic of a free public talk by Malachi Hacohen of Duke University. His lecture, which begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Toy Lounge in Dey Hall, provides a panoramic overview of the changing dynamics of inclusion and inter-faith relations, viewed from a Jewish perspective. 

Feb. 21

Join the Department of English and Comparative Literature for the Critical Speaker Series seminar at 10 a.m. in the Donovan Lounge in Greenlaw Hall. Ian Bogost of Georgia Institute of Technology will discuss “Public Humanities in a Digital Age.” For more info on Bogost, visit .

Former Carolina faculty member Gerald Horne will deliver the 14th annual African-American History Month lecture at
7 p.m. at the Hitchcock room of the Stone Center. Horne’s talk is titled “Why Black Lives Don’t Matter: Rethinking the Origins of the USA.” Horne served as the director of the Stone Center and the Institute for African-American Research and was also a professor of history, communication studies and African/African-American studies at Carolina until 2003. He currently holds the Moores Professorship of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston.

Feb. 22

Zia Haider Rahman (left), author of the highly acclaimed novel In the Light of What We Know, will deliver the 24th annual Mary Stevens Reckford Memorial Lecture in European Studies in Hyde Hall at 7 p.m. The title of the lecture is “Brexit: The Reckoning.” Rahman was born in rural Bangladesh, raised in London and educated in England, Germany and the United States. He is a Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard University.

Come to the Love House at 12:30 p.m. and join the Center for the Study of the American South for a “proper” southern luncheon with Kimberly Kyser, author of Ticket, a modern etiquette book that demystifies the dreaded prissiness of “proper” behavior. Kyser draws on personal experience, historical research and humor to remind us that social skills—especially table manners—will always be a mainstay of civilized conduct. This event is free, but registration is very limited. RSVP to Patrick Horn at pathorn@unc.edu.

New York Times media columnist Jim Rutenberg shares his thoughts on modern politics in Moment of Truth: How Russian-Style Reality Came to America. The free public talk begins at 7 p.m. in the Mandela Auditorium of the FedEx Global Education building. In his 25 years of reporting experience, Rutenberg has been a chief political correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and co-led the Times’ daily coverage of the 2012 presidential campaign.

Feb. 23

Digital Health Everywhere, a free symposium held 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. on the second floor of the Health Sciences Library, will feature researchers, students and library staff, as well as representatives from industry, government and nonprofits, addressing topics like app development, novel devices and digital health work ethics. It’s free and open to the public but registration is required.

Feb. 27

Mary Jo Arnoldi, curator of African ethnology and the arts for the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, will give a free public talk at 5:30 p.m. in the Hanes Art Center room 218 on Contemporary Monuments in Bamako, Mali: Materializing a National Narrative. Arnoldi’s research in Africa focuses on the roles that material and expressive culture play in the construction of identities: local, national and global. She is especially interested in the post-colonial public culture in West Africa.

Deadline to watch

Feb. 19. Nominations due for University honorary degrees to be awarded at the 2019 May Commencement ceremony. The awards recognize individuals who have rendered service to humanity; contributed to knowledge in the scholarship world; enriched lives through talent and creativity; and supported the University.

Got news?

The Gazette welcomes your story ideas and calendar announcements. To make sure your information reaches us in time for the next issue, please submit it at least 10 days before our publication date. You can find our latest publication schedule online.

The next Gazette will be published Feb. 28. To announce events occurring March 115, please submit your information no later than March 5. Email us at gazette@unc.edu or submit through the Got News? page on our website.