October 3, 2007 edition

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The University Board of Trustees on Sept. 26 unanimously approved the plan for Carolina North to develop 250 acres of the nearly 1,000-acre site during the next half-century.

The trustees’ action clears the way for the plan to be reviewed and approved by the Chapel Hill Town Council.

The plan anticipates that 2.5 million square feet of building space will be completed over the first 15 years along the eastern boundary of the property bordering Martin Luther King Boulevard. The first of those projects will be a new 85,000-square-foot Innovation Center for which the University has already requested a special-use permit to begin construction.

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When visiting San Francisco, most tourists flock to see the Golden Gate Bridge, the internationally recognized symbol of the city, considered the engineering marvel of its age when the bridge opened in 1937.

Seventy years later, the San Francisco marvel that has caught the eye of Carolina’s Mark Crowell lies on the edge of the city in Mission Bay. Crowell is associate vice chancellor for economic development and technology transfer.

Once an industrial wasteland, Mission Bay is now home to a satellite campus for the University of California at San Francisco and, next to it, the burgeoning life science complex that is being developed by Alexandria Real Estate Equities of Pasadena, Calif.

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A philosopher who has interests in metaphysics and the mathematics of logic, a geneticist who is working to develop cancer therapies, a computer scientist who specializes in bioinformatics and data mining, and a historian who studies the African-American experience in the American South have received the 2007 Phillip and Ruth Hettleman Prizes for Artistic and Scholarly Achievement by Young Faculty.

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Seven Carolina employees were recognized for their outstanding contributions Sept. 24 at a luncheon at the Carolina Inn. Five people received the Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence and two received the Excellence in Management Awards.

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Campus-based tuition over the past decade has played a pivotal role in generating revenue to bolster faculty pay to keep Carolina competitive.

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Four faculty members receive Hettleman Prizes

A philosopher who has interests in metaphysics and the mathematics of logic, a geneticist who is working to develop cancer therapies, a computer scientist who specializes in bioinformatics and data mining, and a historian who studies the African-American experience in the American South have received the 2007 Phillip and Ruth Hettleman Prizes for Artistic and Scholarly Achievement by Young Faculty.

Hofweber
Hofweber

Perou
Perou

Wang
Wang

Williams
Williams

Chancellor James Moeser recognized the recipients at the Sept. 14 Faculty Council meeting. They are Thomas Hofweber, associate professor of philosophy; Heather Williams, associate professor of history; and Wei Wang, associate professor of computer science, all in the College of Arts and Sciences; along with Charles Perou, associate professor of genetics in the School of Medicine.

The Hettleman Prize, which carries a $5,000 stipend, recognizes the achievements of outstanding junior tenure-track faculty or recently tenured faculty. The winners will present their work Nov. 14 at the Carolina Club and at a spring event.

The award was established by Phillip Hettleman, who was born in 1899 and grew up in Goldsboro in a family with very little money. He earned a scholarship to UNC, went to New York and in 1938 founded Hettleman and Co., a Wall Street investment firm. He established the award in 1986 and died later that year.

Hofweber has served as an assistant professor at Carolina since 2003. A native of Germany, his research interests include metaphysics, the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mathematics. Hofweber’s work addresses core problems in philosophy that have long been the focus of attention, and his research achievements have been astonishing, said Geoffrey Sayre-
McCord, chair of the philosophy department.

He has published 11 refereed journal articles or book chapters, all major pieces of philosophical scholarship, Sayre-McCord said. “This work has been published in the four most prestigious journals in the profession and in a highly regarded serial devoted to the best recent work in metaphysics,” he said.

Perou came to Carolina in 2000. His lab is working to identify and characterize different types of tumors in order to develop more effective cancer therapies, working specifically on breast cancer.

“Dr. Perou is an exceptionally talented early career scientist who is already an internationally known leader in the emerging field of genetic technology and its application to human disease,” wrote H. Shelton Earp III, director of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and chair of the genetics department, in a recommendation letter. “His ground-breaking papers in breast cancer molecular profiling, in essence, defined a new field. He is at the cutting edge of breast cancer research innovation.”

Wang, a member of the Carolina Center for Genomic Sciences, joined the faculty in 2002 and won the Junior Faculty Development Award in 2003. Wang’s research interests are in data mining, bioinformatics and databases, and she has filed seven patents.

“Wei’s research is also a great success story in our departmental research strategy, which has long focused on collaborative research with scientists to provide tools that enable better service,” wrote Jan F. Prins, chair of the computer science department and Frederick P. Brooks, Kenan professor of computer science.

A prolific researcher, she has published nearly 100 papers, book chapters and edited volumes, almost two-thirds of which were published during her tenure at Carolina, the nomination letter said.

Williams, who joined the faculty in 2004, studies the experiences of African Americans in the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in the American South. The history department voted unanimously in favor of her tenure this year.

“We believe that Professor Williams is well on her way to becoming a national leader in African-American history and a dynamic teacher and colleague for the UNC community,” wrote Lloyd Kramer, Dean Smith distinguished professor of history and chair of the department, in his recommendation letter. “She is a ‘groundbreaking’ scholar who will go on to an exceptional career.”

Her first book, “Self-Taught: African-American Education in Slavery and Freedom,” was published by UNC Press and won three prizes.

 

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